Crook and candy

Crook of the Dead
Look at that spooky cover, just in time for Halloween!

Lydia Trinket is all adventured out for the time being. CROOK OF THE DEAD is now available in both Kindle and paperback editions, completing the trilogy. I’ve got mixed emotions about finishing, because Lydia has been so fun to write. And I’m so appreciative of the emails from folks who’ve also found her fun to read!

As is often the case with new releases, my mailing list subscribers have been enjoying a 99¢ sale on the Kindle edition of Crook. Now that there are less than 24 hours remaining on that special price, I’m letting you fine folks in on it as well. It goes up to $3.99 on Tuesday 10/20, so don’t wait!

GHOST IN THE CANTEEN and PEAK OF THE DEVIL are celebrating Lydia’s sunset ride with Kindle Countdown deals, and are priced at 99¢ all week. It’s a great time of year to get into the series, if you haven’t already.

Speaking of a great time of year, who’s doing NaNo? I sort of am, but I’m cheating. I’m drafting a project right now and can’t sit on it until November 1, so it’ll be partly done by the time NaNo arrives, and the draft will be finished somewhere around mid-month. I may or may not use the latter half of NaNo to play around with something else, depending on how rigorous my revision looks to be.

Either way, I’ve already broken into the Halloween candy. Obviously. I’m kind of into the Three Musketeers this year, which is unusual for me. What’s your position on the best fun-sized candy bar?

Three awesome indie novels you should be reading right now

I’ve got two and a half releases this fall, so I’ve been busy, and neither posting much nor reading as much as I’d like. But I’ve been slowly creeping my way through my TBR pile, and I wanted to give a shout-out to three exceptional indie novels I’ve read over the past few months. They’re very different, so there’s something here for a wide range of tastes. Check them out!

51REmDft85L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Wrecked & Yours, by CeeCee James
Family saga/romance about three homeless teens, the things that drove them apart, and what brings them back together.

Already known for her gripping memoirs, this is CeeCee James’s first novel, and at $2.99, it’s a steal. James’s writing is lovely, and I defy you not to shed a tear for these well-drawn characters. But don’t worry, those teary moments are deftly balanced with terrific dialogue and moments of humor. This story has the depth to deal with weighty issues, yet never feels heavy to read.




Insylum, by Z. Rider
Horror tale of two buddies taking one last thrill ride before one ships off to Afghanistan, into the Hotel California of haunted attractions.

For those who like their touching stories about the power of friendship to be a little, you know, bloodier. And sometimes maggotier. I became a Z. Rider fan when I read Suckers, so my expectations were high, and Insylum did not let me down. I’ll warn you though, this book is graphic and not for the faint of heart. Z. Rider knows what scares you, and is not afraid to use it.



51NMivVa83L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Sisters of Sorrow, by Axel Blackwell
YA dark fantasy full of suspense and mystery, about teens abandoned in a world of sinister secrets, monsters, witches, and evil nuns.

Don’t let the YA tag fool you, this story is gripping at any age. From edge-of-your seat action to beautifully rendered description to engaging, likable, but appropriately flawed characters (Anna is not your average YA Mary Sue), it has it all and then some. The only downside is you might feel a little guilty for how much fun you have being drawn into such a creepy world. Make sure you don’t start it until you have time to finish it.


Release news

UPDATE: Rising Fury is now live!

An update from the Den of Iniquity and Tea that is my office:

I’m very excited to kick off my new series, Hexing House, with Rising Fury in September. Details are below, and you can read the first chapter here.

I’ll be giving a very special deal on Rising Fury to my newsletter subscribers, so be sure to sign up in the sidebar to the right, if you haven’t already. As a reminder, my mailing list is only used for new release announcements, your email address will never be shared, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For all the Trinket fans out there, thank you so much for your emails! Lydia’s final adventure (for now, at least) is called Crook of the Dead, and will be available in October. I’ll have that cover and first chapter to show you in September.

Thank you, as always, for reading!

Rising Fury

Thea Gideon is stunned to find a winged creature in her aunt’s barn. She’s downright flabbergasted when he offers her a job as a fury of Hexing House, delivering punishment for a price. Once a red carpet darling, now a panic-stricken recluse, Thea is the last person qualified to become an agent of vengeance.

But Thea’s cousin has vanished, apparently at the hands of the furies, and Thea has promised to do whatever it takes to find her. Even if that means becoming one of them to gain their trust.

Now Thea has a month to grow wings, sprout claws, and rid herself of all weakness. And that’s the easy part. The transformation will be dangerous, but uncovering the conspiracy behind her cousin’s disappearance, and her own recruitment, may be deadly.


Amazon vs. Authors United, Round 2

Last year, Authors United, a group of professional writers—by their own definition the most prestigious one ever assembled!—managed to write the very worst persuasive essay I’d ever seen.

This year, they’ve topped it. And because being concise with misinformation and disingenuous posturing is hard, there’s also a companion position paper of 24 pages.

Some of you are no doubt too busy to read all that, so once again, I’ll give you a quick rundown of the whole kerfuffle.


AMAZON: You again? We’re trying to work here.

AUTHORS UNITED: You’re a monopoly! And a monopsony!

AMAZON: If you’re a Prime member, we can get a dictionary to your house in two days. Better yet, we have them available for Kindle!

AUTHORS UNITED: You’re blocking the sale of books!

AMAZON: How’s that?

AUTHORS UNITED: Because you sell too many of the books!


AUTHORS UNITED: And you try to sell more of your own products than ours! And you don’t do ANYTHING to foster competition!

AMAZON: Business?

AUTHORS  UNITED: And if those poor pathetic self publishers don’t price their books how you say, you cut their royalties!

AMAZON: You mean, we cut them down to an only slightly higher percentage than you get all the time, instead of a way way higher one?

(INDIE AUTHORS: Please leave us out of this.)

AUTHORS UNITED: You have to do what we want, because culture! We are the only source of books and the only means of free expression!

AMAZON: Are not.


AMAZON: We agree.

AUTHORS UNITED: The DOJ will hear about this!

AMAZON: We love those guys. Tell them we said hi.

Further reading:
Passive Guy provides some excellent legal commentary
Joe Konrath provides some excellent fisking

Here’s the thing, and I said this last time I blogged mean about AU: I really don’t like blogging mean, honest I don’t. But I feel compelled to respond when they behave this badly, and so deliberately pursue their own self-interest while pretending to be motivated by nothing but altruism and apple pie and the children. It’s so disappointing to see in people I’ve read and enjoyed and in many cases, admired. And as you can see by this one paragraph, if I play it straight it just turns into a boring lecture.

The battle at Hardhome was good though, right?

MANY MAJOR SPOILERS for Game of Thrones and A Song of Ice and Fire!

It was the not-best of seasons, it was the arguably-worst of seasons. But there were a few bright moments, no? Okay, the one bright moment. Hardhome was, IMO, the best set piece Game of Thrones has ever done.The rest, though. Damn, you guys.

Here are my thoughts on the most controversial bits.

Sansa plugged into the Winterfell storyline
I would’ve done the same thing. Sansa is one of the show’s stars, and at this point in the book she’s babysitting the most annoying character George R. R. Martin has ever written. Meanwhile you’ve got a major storyline featuring a minor character the audience doesn’t know or care about. The swap was a no-brainer. That doesn’t mean it was executed well, though. So onward to…

Sansa’s rape
Well, once you’ve put her together with Ramsey, this sort of thing is pretty much inevitable, isn’t it? I don’t object to where the story went. I do object to some sloppy characterization. A great deal of screen time, going back to last season, was spent trying to convince us that we’ve got a new, badass Sansa, one who is going to be a player now. But in That Scene, and in fact most of the scenes leading up to it, she does nothing but tearfully submit to it all. I’m not victim-blaming, I’m writer-blaming. Imagine Margaery Tyrell in Sansa’s position and you’ll see what I mean. Tell me Margaery doesn’t immediately, expertly assess those psychos and begin trying to manipulate circumstances in her favor. (Whether she’d be successful or not is beside the point.) Because she has game. That’s what game looks like.

The producers strongly implied that George told them this happens. So… Book-Stannis does this? “No more burnings” Stannis? “If I die, put my daughter on the iron throne” Stannis? Ok, but if that Stannis burns his only heir and brings the House of Baratheon to extinction, it’ll be because he’s sure beyond doubt that it’s the only way to save the realm he’s responsible for from immediate and certain destruction. That is the only way it fits his character, and if he does it for any other reason, I’ll happily call bullshit on George, too. Meanwhile, the show utterly failed to establish those sorts of stakes. The destruction of the realm is hundreds of miles away, neither certain nor immediate as yet. He’s not facing white walkers; he’s facing a few icicles and twenty of Ramsey Bolton’s undersecretaries. He’s not fighting for the realm; he’s fighting for Winterfell. This is a subtask of a subtask on the Save The Realm Gantt chart. Even in the kind of twisted mind where there’s a good reason to murder your daughter in an incredibly painful way, this is not that reason.

The Dorne plot line
Much as I appreciate the screen time for the always-hilarious Jerome Flynn, seriously, why is this here? It was a slowly moving story in an already way too slowly moving season, that accomplished almost nothing in the end. If the whole point was to kill Myrcella, just have a single, five minute scene in which Darkstar leaps out of the shadows, kills her with flair (but limited accuracy), and leaps back off screen again. No need to explain who he is or why he’s done it. He is of the night! That’s all people need to know.

For the watch
Kit Harington says he’s really dead. The producers say he’s really dead. He sure looked really dead. Eh. I still don’t think he’s dead. Certainly not before some big reveal about his mother. Jon Snow is endgame. Maybe not in the show, and maybe Show-Jon really is dead. If that’s the case, I’ll be okay, because at least he died without the whole pink letter and him behaving completely out of character leading up to it.

The scene in the fighting pit
While others are raging over poor Sansa and even poorer Shireen, this is the scene that really convinced me that Game of Thrones has lost it, possibly irretrievably. I’ve seldom seen anything so stupid on television, and I’m including reality TV in that. So you’ve got these horrible terrorists, right? So horrible they killed Ser Barristan! They butcher people randomly all over the arena. Just blood everywhere, no mercy for anyone. They close in on their prey. They’ve got her surrounded! There are dozens and dozens of them! They’re vicious! So they… come at her two at a time. Then when she flies off to reenact The Neverending Story, leaving the people who’ve just been defending her with their lives completely vulnerable, these fearsome, bloodthirsty terrorists… disperse. I just can’t even with this. And thanks, by the way, for ensuring that Limahl song was in my head for three days after. Seriously, I have to end the post here, because there are no words for this badness.

Game of WTF?

Yes, I have a lot to say about Game of Thrones. So much WTF. But I’m going to wait until after the season finale on Sunday before I say any of it. Who knows, maybe that last episode will change everything. Maybe Dany will wake up next to Daario and say, “Honey, I had the weirdest dream! I was jumping over a shark…” And then we’ll get the real story.


I write for no deeper purpose than to entertain. My words are not going to be the catalyst for some great and meaningful change in a person’s life. But I still positively revel in the freedom to say exactly what I like, exactly how I like, without fear that an agent or editor would never let me get away with it, and without the need to revise toward the type of popular appeal a big publisher requires to make the math work these days.

So I can only imagine what this freedom means to people who are saying something inspired by a higher calling, that might otherwise be censored by the mainstream.

Now, given the realities of population distribution, odds are a fair number of those people are assholes whose idea of a higher calling sucks. We may not be better off for hearing what they have to say.

But we’re all better off for their having the freedom to say it.

What’s your Yay Indie thought today?

When it’s okay to tread old ground

Spoilers for the movie Sinister.

Sinister was on Syfy last night. Funny, the first time I watched it I remember I didn’t find it as scary as everyone said it was. Probably because it was predictable. You knew exactly where this movie was going, and it was frustrating that Ethan Hawke and Deputy Dawg took so long to figure it out. Have they never watched a horror movie before? Because there was nothing new here.

Snuff films: done. The concept that watching the terror on film/video will draw you in and make you part of the terror: done. Shaky, faux-home movie camera work: done. Family moving into a house where another family was slaughtered: done. One parent putting the family in jeopardy while trying to hide it from the other parent: done. Mysterious monster guys with weird white faces: done. Serial killers: done. Footsteps in the attic: done. Ghostly figures walking where the audience can see them, but the protagonist can’t: done. Lots of dark rooms with one light at the edge of the shot: done. Creepy children: really done. Relentless use of jump scares: do we even need to talk about this one?

Honestly, all we’re missing here is a van full of teenagers getting picked off one by one. The only place I’d expect to see this many horror tropes in one place is in a spoof. Which Sinister is not.

But I already knew all that last night when I watched it the second time. I wasn’t looking for anything fresh or new, so I just, you know, watched it. For what it was. And damn if I wasn’t scared. I began to see what all the hype was about, back when it first came out. That is a seriously scary movie, if you let it be.

Because the jump scares, while expected, still made me jump. They were really good jump scares. The creepy children? Some of the creepiest ever. Snuff films? Whole new level. The gore was done right, used frequently enough to be disturbing, but not so frequently as to desensitize the audience to it. The monster guy was monstery enough without being so over-the-top that you just kind of wanted to laugh at him. And the home movie footage did not make me nauseous, which is a huge plus. (Film makers, would you please stop making me feel carsick with that jumpyass camera work? It’s not scary, just annoying.)

A reminder, I guess, that as much as we like to throw around phrases like “a fresh spin on…,” it’s not always necessary for your spin to be fresh. As long as your spin is good.

The devil’s due

Due on your Kindle, that is. See what I did there? Hee.

You can find both the Kindle and paperback editions of Peak of the Devil at Amazon even as I type.

The Kindle edition is on sale for 99¢–that’s 75% off regular price–through April 30 only.

Peak of the Devil will be available at other online retailers later in the week. Watch my sidebar and/or Bookshop page for links if you’re looking for it at iBooks, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Scribd, or Inktera.

Thanks for checking it out!