Release news

UPDATE: Rising Fury is now live!

An update from the Den of Iniquity and Tea that is my office:

I’m very excited to kick off my new series, Hexing House, with Rising Fury in September. Details are below, and you can read the first chapter here.

I’ll be giving a very special deal on Rising Fury to my newsletter subscribers, so be sure to sign up in the sidebar to the right, if you haven’t already. As a reminder, my mailing list is only used for new release announcements, your email address will never be shared, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For all the Trinket fans out there, thank you so much for your emails! Lydia’s final adventure (for now, at least) is called Crook of the Dead, and will be available in October. I’ll have that cover and first chapter to show you in September.

Thank you, as always, for reading!

Rising Fury

Thea Gideon is stunned to find a winged creature in her aunt’s barn. She’s downright flabbergasted when he offers her a job as a fury of Hexing House, delivering punishment for a price. Once a red carpet darling, now a panic-stricken recluse, Thea is the last person qualified to become an agent of vengeance.

But Thea’s cousin has vanished, apparently at the hands of the furies, and Thea has promised to do whatever it takes to find her. Even if that means becoming one of them to gain their trust.

Now Thea has a month to grow wings, sprout claws, and rid herself of all weakness. And that’s the easy part. The transformation will be dangerous, but uncovering the conspiracy behind her cousin’s disappearance, and her own recruitment, may be deadly.

 

When it’s okay to tread old ground

Spoilers for the movie Sinister.

Sinister was on Syfy last night. Funny, the first time I watched it I remember I didn’t find it as scary as everyone said it was. Probably because it was predictable. You knew exactly where this movie was going, and it was frustrating that Ethan Hawke and Deputy Dawg took so long to figure it out. Have they never watched a horror movie before? Because there was nothing new here.

Snuff films: done. The concept that watching the terror on film/video will draw you in and make you part of the terror: done. Shaky, faux-home movie camera work: done. Family moving into a house where another family was slaughtered: done. One parent putting the family in jeopardy while trying to hide it from the other parent: done. Mysterious monster guys with weird white faces: done. Serial killers: done. Footsteps in the attic: done. Ghostly figures walking where the audience can see them, but the protagonist can’t: done. Lots of dark rooms with one light at the edge of the shot: done. Creepy children: really done. Relentless use of jump scares: do we even need to talk about this one?

Honestly, all we’re missing here is a van full of teenagers getting picked off one by one. The only place I’d expect to see this many horror tropes in one place is in a spoof. Which Sinister is not.

But I already knew all that last night when I watched it the second time. I wasn’t looking for anything fresh or new, so I just, you know, watched it. For what it was. And damn if I wasn’t scared. I began to see what all the hype was about, back when it first came out. That is a seriously scary movie, if you let it be.

Because the jump scares, while expected, still made me jump. They were really good jump scares. The creepy children? Some of the creepiest ever. Snuff films? Whole new level. The gore was done right, used frequently enough to be disturbing, but not so frequently as to desensitize the audience to it. The monster guy was monstery enough without being so over-the-top that you just kind of wanted to laugh at him. And the home movie footage did not make me nauseous, which is a huge plus. (Film makers, would you please stop making me feel carsick with that jumpyass camera work? It’s not scary, just annoying.)

A reminder, I guess, that as much as we like to throw around phrases like “a fresh spin on…,” it’s not always necessary for your spin to be fresh. As long as your spin is good.

Suckers

So here is the blurb for Suckers, by Z. Rider:

When worn-out musician Dan Ferry decides to take a shortcut back to the band’s hotel, he picks the wrong dark alley to go down. Within days of being attacked by a bat-like creature, he becomes consumed with the need to drink human blood.

Terrified of what will happen if he doesn’t get his fix–and terrified of what he’ll do to get it–he turns to his best friend and bandmate, Ray Ford, for help. But what the two don’t know as they try to keep Dan’s situation quiet is that the parasite driving Dan’s addiction has the potential to wipe out humankind.

You’ll note two key phrases there: need to drink blood and potential to wipe out humankind. That tells me it’s a vampire apocalypse novel. It takes serious balls to release a vampire apocalypse novel. The only way to write to a more saturated market would be to throw in some zombies. It’s a major challenge, and not for the faint of pen, to pull this off. Justin Cronin pulled it off. Z. Rider does, too.

I mention Cronin because sometimes Rider reminds me of him. Sometimes of Stephen King. Those are both big compliments in my world. But more importantly, she mostly doesn’t remind me of anyone. She owns this story. This story, despite having all the elements a horror story requires, is not one you’ve read before.

The bulk of the credit for that goes to the characters. Dan and Ray are interesting as individuals, but they’re even more interesting when taken together. Their relationship is a big part of the pull that keeps you turning pages when you should be doing laundry. As it’s burdened by greater and greater challenges, you want to know how much it can take. And you root for it not to fall apart.

This is a story about friendship, addiction, and then horrifying blood sucking gore. Don’t get me wrong, the horrifying blood sucking gore is quite horrifying. But it takes all three to make it work. This works very, very well.

And extra points for the mention of coffee regular. It’s been many years since I left New England, but that took me right back to my old morning commute. I don’t especially miss Boston. (Boston is great, but you know. We have sunshine and shrimp & grits here.) I don’t especially miss coffee. But I totally miss that delicious marble cruller. And also the years when eating a delicious marble cruller every day would have zero effect on my weight. Ah, youth.

And the point of that little aside is: it’s a great skill to take one detail like that and use it to evoke a setting so well. This is just good, solid writing.

Go read it.

My newsletter subscribers are more awesome than you

Because they got to read the first chapter of book two in the Lydia Trinket series, Peak of the Devil, last week. Now you can read it here and be awesome too. (Warning! Contains adult language. Reader discretion is advised.)

The Kindle edition of Peak of the Devil will be 99¢—that’s 75% off regular price—April 28-30 only. All editions, including print, will be widely available at major online retailers the last week in April.

Newsletter subscribers will get a release announcement, so you can both safeguard your awesomeness and make sure you don’t miss the sale by joining my mailing list.

And don’t forget that all eBook editions of Ghost in the Canteen have been permanently priced at 99¢, so as to be sure there are no barriers to entry into the series. If you aren’t awesome, I’m afraid you have nobody to blame but yourself.

And I think that’s about all the shameless self promotion we’ll be having around here, until I’ve got the cover to show you all.

Search terms: you ask, I answer

This is one of my favorite games to play on my other blog, but I don’t think I’ve ever done it here. I feel it’s only polite to try to help those who visit me seeking something specific. Luckily, WordPress can tell me what they were looking for.

real dornish peppers: It would have been better for you to hear this from a loved one, but I’m afraid there’s not a real Dorne. I imagine you could substitute any of several varieties of chili?

things that are not scary: Macaroons. Napkins. Toothpaste. The Blair Witch Project.

sansa loves lemon cakes: Yep.

jen rasmussen hawaii nude: Not that I recall.

richard armitage butt: Seriously, four of you in the last thirty days? I am not the proper resource for this. Meaning no offense to Mr. Armitage, there aren’t very many people whose butts I care to know stuff about.

american horror story briefly topics: Ghosts, aliens, medical experiments gone awry, odd explanations for the Black Dahlia, creepy clowns, creepy nuns, creepy war criminals, completely uncreepy and nonsensical witches, serial killers, and ladies who want babies. Not in that order.

info on murder of jen rasmussen: I imagine I’d be the last to know.

we found a witch may we burn her: How do you know she’s a witch?

jen scary thing: Not generally. Maybe if that Hawaii thing was true.

where do you send for letter to cary fukunaga: I can’t help with this, but if you write to him, tell him I loved his Jane Eyre!

four and tris with supernatural powers: I agree this would be cool.

excessive planning: THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH THIS.

i would always rather be happy than dignified: Jane and I both approve.

mr rochester x reader lemon: This is almost certainly code for something, but as I’m not a Cold War spy, I don’t know what. Perhaps my commenters can offer suggestions, if it wouldn’t blow their cover.

Pie, Revival, and telling me my butt looks fat

Finally coming up for air after all the holiday festivities. I hope all my American peeps had a great Thanksgiving! Do you still have pie? I still have exactly one piece of pie, which I’m strongly considering having for breakfast. But that’s just because I made my mom make another pie right before she left. Was that mean? Otherwise I’d have been out, despite having a 2:1 person:pie ratio at the table last Thursday.

Thanksgiving was late this year, which means if you celebrate Christmas and left it until after like I did, you’re already behind on your holiday shopping. Luckily for you, Kindle books are so easy to buy and give, and Ghost in the Canteen is just 99 cents all week long!

Speaking of which, I’m not that author who lets her mom write a review. Or her sister, or her best friend, or even her beagle. I do know some of the people who’ve left reviews so far, but they’re real people who’ve really read the book. (Or at least I’m pretty sure they’re real, although I’ve only ever met them online.) And they are not those people in your life who would hesitate to tell you your butt looks fat, you know? The upside is that I know, and you can rest assured, that my reviews are legitimate and honest.

The downside? I don’t have enough reviews. So if you’ve read Ghost and enjoyed it, please consider leaving an honest reader review on Amazon.

My own honest reader review, thus far, of Stephen King’s Revival is this: Revival is on my Kindle. The new WoW expansion is on my PC. In my scant bit of unwinding time before I go to bed each night, I look from one to the other. And I choose WoW pretty much every time.

I’d say I can’t remember the last time I was this unengaged in a King book, but I can: it was the last one, Mr. Mercedes, which was, if it can be believed, even worse than The Tommyknockers. So a bad streak here. Revival is better written than Mr. Mercedes, and the characters are interesting, but maybe I’m just not clicking with it. I’m about 35% in and it just lacks momentum. There’s nothing keeping me coming back. If it was almost anyone else’s book, I’d have put it down by now. But since it’s King I’ll probably tough it out. It is creating a backlog in my TBR pile, though.

So that’s my update. I KNOW YOU WANTED AN UPDATE. You can go back to stimulating the economy now.

Did we learn nothing from Pennywise?

This post contains spoilers for Stephen King’s It and last week’s American Horror Story, but not this week’s, because I haven’t watched it yet. I don’t mind if you spoil it when making comments, though.

American Horror Story has made me sad. They had such a great thing going with that clown. But they ruined it. No no, not by killing him. I mean, I’m kind of bummed about that too, because it’s too early in the season to lose their best feature, but I could have handled that.

But first they had to give him an origin story, and that’s where it all went wrong. Horror rule, you guys: leave the clown alone. Resist the urge to mess with the clown.

Do you remember when you read It, and Pennywise was just the most terrifying thing? And then the makeup came off and it was just, like, a big bug? That was such a letdown. The only thing that kept it from ruining the book was that the rest of it was so damned scary that you could forgive even that big a flaw. American Horror Story just made the same mistake, and they haven’t got Stephen King’s skill to talk their way out of it. (Don’t feel bad, Ryan Murphy and friends. Nobody does.)

Because you have two kinds of villains: villains who are uncomfortably like the rest of us, and monsters. The former are relatable, and that makes them both scary and tragic. You might hate them, but you get it, how they became what they did, the things that make us crack, the darkness within all of us. Nobody likes to look too long into that darkness, and these villains work because somewhere in the back of your mind you’re afraid that, given the same circumstances, that could be you.

These are good candidates for origin stories and mask removal. We need to know their motivations and we need to understand them. They need character arcs of their own. They don’t work otherwise, and they come off flat.

But monsters work the opposite way. They must be mysterious. The source of their terror is their otherness, their inhumanity, the sense of something bigger and badder than any of us. It’s great for them to be disguised as something familiar, especially if it’s something related to childhood, like a clown or a doll. That only adds to the effect. But you must make me imagine something awful under there without ever, under any circumstances, showing it to me. Take off the mask and give me a big spider, or a sad man who hasn’t got the capacity to judge the right or wrong of his actions, and you’ve just replaced the mystique with something I can deal with, even something mundane. The trick to the monster is understanding that you can’t scare someone better than they can scare themselves.

Where American Horror Story went wrong is that they started with a monster and then at the last second tried to swap it for the human kind of villain. Once you’ve put someone in a clown suit, he is not that kind of villain. He is unequivocally a monster, and there’s nothing you can show me under his makeup that will be scarier than him with it on.

Okay, fine, maybe they didn’t want him to be scary anymore. But why not? Why ruin all that terror momentum they had going, just on the off chance that they could use a few minutes before they killed him off, after we’ve been watching a monster for weeks, to make us see a sad man instead, and feel sorry for him?

There’s no point to that, and also, it didn’t work. The origin story wasn’t interesting or good. And going for the cheap gross-out with that jaw? Totally ruined a perfectly good evil clown. It’s like Pennywise all over again.

Just leave the clown alone.

Props for getting Wes Bentley though, AHS.

Everyone hail to the pumpkin song

Eleven things for Halloween:

1. The post title, of course, comes from the song “This is Halloween” in A Nightmare Before Christmas. This was the correct answer to the October poll asking for the best Halloween movie. Fifty percent of you got it right.

2. The other half of you chose It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, which is certainly a good one. But you’re still doing Halloween wrong if you don’t know Jack Skellington is the pumpkin king.

3. Nobody chose either Halloween or Night of the Living Dead. I was especially surprised that Michael Myers did not garner a single vote, although I quite agree with you. (By the way, there is no November poll because mah book is being released next week and will be occupying the sidebar space where the poll normally sits. But I’m sure we can all agree that the best Thanksgiving pie is cherry anyway. Shut up with your pumpkin.)

4. ahsclownAmerican Horror Story, which was maybe the least scary thing on TV last year, is the scariest it’s been since Season 1 this year, and maybe even scarier. You really can’t beat a creepy clown when it comes to scares, and John Carroll Lynch is giving us the creepiest one since Tim Curry played Pennywise.

5. The adaptation of It in which Tim Curry played Pennywise was not scary, despite Curry doing a fantastic job. The production values were… not high. So there’s no point in watching that for Halloween, but you might consider reading it, because it still wins my scariest book ever award.

6. ‘Salem’s Lot and Pet Sematary are my runners up for scariest Stephen King books. His son Joe Hill’s NOS4A2 is also really scary.

7. That family hasn’t got the corner on scary, of course. The Haunting of Hill House is a classic that stands up, and Poe will always be the master. I haven’t read much lately that genuinely scared me, though. (By all means, give me your recommendations in comments.)

8. If you want a movie instead, my personal picks for scariest movies are Seven and Silence of the Lambs.

9. Last year’s The Conjuring deserves a mention too, because it brought the scary back to scary movies. We need less of that nauseating found footage nonsense, and more good old fashioned scares.

10. I’m going to say it one more time, movie people: startle does not equal scare. Don’t just make me jump and call it a day. I’m not going to have nightmares about being startled. You’ve got to disturb me.

11. My fun sized candy bar of choice this year is Almond Joy. Yours?

Wake-Robin Ridge

wake robinIn the comments to one of the posts below, Marcia Meara describes her novel Wake-Robin Ridge as “romantic suspense with a touch of spooky.” Well, let’s consider this post my open letter to Marcia requesting something full-out spooky, because if this is her “touch” of it, I’d love to see what it’s like when she goes whole hog.

Don’t get me wrong, the love stories this book does focus on are very sweet. From a purely subjective standpoint, they run a little sentimental for my usual taste, along the Notebook/Bridges of Madison County end of the romance spectrum, but even for a morbid horror girl like me there is some lovely stuff here. I especially enjoyed the letters from one of the star-crossed lovers to another. And dogs! Several dogs. I’m choosing to ignore the presence of the cat.

But it will surprise nobody who knows me that I found the scenes with the ghost, and the hours leading up to the ghost becoming a ghost, to be the strongest in the book. They are expertly paced, and the imagery is first-rate. That phantom red Impala, making its awful way around an isolated cabin in the woods, and that rabbit–that rabbit!–are the things that will stick with me after I’ve put this book away.

I happen to live in Charlotte, not far from where this book is set, and the descriptions of the mountains and woods of North Carolina are very well done. I had a small nitpick or two with the details, but the important thing about that is, she got the barbeque right. [EDIT: to the surprise of absolutely no one, those nitpicks turned out to be my mistakes, not the author’s.]

Two thumbs up for this book, and I’ve already bought Ms. Meara’s other currently released novel, Swamp Ghosts.

In which I briefly come up for air

As I wrap up my NaNo – I estimate I have about 4k to go – I’m looking around at all the things I’ve let slide in November, as I always do, every November. I see I haven’t blogged in almost three weeks, but neglected social media is the least of my problems. You should see the dust around this place. Thanksgiving is in what? Four days? Egads, I say.

But that’s as it should be. Networking and maintaining connections is important. Dusting is important. Making pie for all these people is important. Outlining and researching and editing are all important. You couldn’t neglect those things year-round the way you do during NaNo, which is why NaNo is only once a year. But while things like research and social media and pie can all support your writing, nothing supports it so well as actually, you know, writing. By which I mean, writing actual words in an actual document, which as it turns out, is not the same thing as thinking about writing or talking about writing or intending to write when you have the time. If NaNo is about nothing else, it’s about reconnecting with that one simple, yet sometimes elusive, concept.

Lots of people want to be writers. Less actually want to write. Fewer still are willing to make sacrifices to do it. Congratulations to all the people who made time to write this November, however painfully, and at whatever cost to the cleanliness of your clothing.

I expect to resurface after Thanksgiving with the self-absorbed posts about NaNoWriMo behind me, clearing the way for self-absorbed posts about a variety of other topics. American Horror Story is wrapping up. The Following is coming again soon, and it was such a disappointment the last time around that I may take my revenge by watching it again just so I can say mean things about it. Catching Fire is upon us. And get ready people, because The Desolation of Smaug is! Finally! Coming!